Category Archives: Publications

An organic photodetector with a natural sense of rhythm

Researchers from the University of Strasbourg and CNRS (France), in collaboration with Tsinghua University and Shenzhen University (China), have developed an organic photodetector that is extremely sensitive in the visible and near-infrared range, with which a first application in the field of health monitoring has been realized. These results have just been published … Continue Reading ››

Boosting the electrical performance of 2D materials with molecular bridges

Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with Trinity College Dublin (Ireland) and the University of Cambridge (United Kingdom), have devised a new molecular strategy to boost the performance of electronic devices based on semiconducting 2D materials. These results have been published in Nature Nanotechnology.

Within … Continue Reading ››

When rocks lay the groundwork for the origin of life

Mineral catalysts found in deep-sea vents convert CO2 and H2 to biomolecules, showing striking parallels to known biological pathways

An international collaboration of researchers in Germany, France and Japan investigated the catalytic activities of minerals found in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The results suggest that mineral-driven chemical reactions might be closely mapped onto microbial carbon metabolism. … Continue Reading ››

Graphene as a detective to unravel molecular self-assembly

Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with Humboldt University of Berlin and DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials/RWTH Aachen University (Germany), have demonstrated that graphene devices can be used to monitor in real time the dynamics of molecular self-assembly at the solid/liquid interface. Their results have been published in Nature Communications.

Mimicking life’s biochemical networks with Iron

Synthesis and breakdown of universal metabolic precursors promoted by ironResearchers in Strasbourg, France, have found that mixing two small biomolecules, glyoxylate and pyruvate, in iron-salt-rich water produces a reaction network resembling life’s core biochemistry. This discovery provides insight into how chemistry on the early Earth primed the evolution of the most ancient … Continue Reading ››

Mirrors change chemical selectivity

A chemical reaction transforms the molecules that make up matter. To influence chemical reactions, chemists typically act on the molecules themselves, rather than the space in which the reaction takes places. However, researchers at the University of Strasbourg have shown that chemical reactions can indeed be influenced simply by conducting them between two appropriately spaced mirrors, kept only micrometers … Continue Reading ››

Enlightening full-color displays

Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with University College London (United Kingdom), and Humboldt University Berlin (Germany), have shown that a subtle combination of light-emitting semiconducting polymers and small photoswitchable molecules can be used to fabricate light-emitting organic transistors operating under optical remote control, paving the way to the next … Continue Reading ››

The art of pastry: a graphene mille-feuille for highly sensitive health monitoring

Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań (Poland) and the University of Florence (Italy), have developed a new generation of pressure sensors based on graphene and molecular “springs”. Thanks to their highest sensitivity, these devices are ideally suited for health monitoring and point-of-care … Continue Reading ››

Oscillating artificial microtubules

Oscillating artificial microtubules

Chemically fuelled processes control size oscillations of natural fibres inside the body such as microtubules or actin filaments. Researchers from the University of Strasbourg have now discovered similar size oscillations in a completely artificial system. Brightly coloured molecules form extended supramolecular fibres that can be controlled by redox chemistry. In a … Continue Reading ››